Fox 10 Interview of Dr Morrison

Fox 10 was at our office interviewing Dr Morrison and a patient of ours about CoolTouch Laser to treat veins. Thanks to TV and social media, patients can learn about new therapies to treat their veins.

In the last 2 years, the FDA has approved a New Foam  called Varisolve ( Varithena) for treating venous insufficiency, in other words a way to treat or close the leaking, saphenous veins that used to be stripped out! This isn’t used for the surface, cosmetic, skin veins that we can see. This replaces  therapies like laser or radio frequency ablation or MOCA, Clarivein type procedures.

The other approved last November is VenaSeal, Closure by Medtronic.                                  ( medtronicendovenous.com) This procedure is the only non thermal, non- tumescent, non-sclerosant procedure that uses a proprietary adhesive delivered by a doctor using their kit to deliver in the saphenous vein, to close the veins with faulty valves. Patients who fear anesthetic, heat, pain etc will prefer this method and if this is the only treatment needed, the patient won’t need compression stockings that day and may return to work or play.

COME SEE US AT MORRISON VEIN INSTITUTE TO EVALUATE YOUR VEINS: 4807758460  morrisonveinpromo@gmail.com  or morrisonveininstitute@yahoo.com

More than leg veins can be trouble

 

Klippel-Trenaunay A rare and genetic syndrome that is often the most severe
 manifestations of varicose vein disease. The syndrome is a vascular disorder
 that consists of abnormalities in the venous system, lymphatic system, and
 arterial systems. This disorder often manifests itself in the form of 
 varicose veins, arterio-venous malformations (AVMs), lymphedema, port-wine stains
 and eventually limb hypertrophy (enlargement of the involved extremity). 
 Treatments may be an option for patients after a specific workup.
Face veins and hand veins can be more than cosmetic; you want a vein care 
specialist called a phlebologist with lots of experience to care for you.
Call us for a vein screening and then a workup for a specially 
designed treatment plan. 480-775-8460. #Morrisonvein www.morrisonvein.com


 

Chronic Venous Insufficiency equals Vein disease

“CHRONIC VENOUS INSUFFICIENCY  (CVI) is one of the most common vascular diseases in the developed world and is a major contributor to psychosocial morbidity.” And one of the worst outcomes of venous disease is leg ulcers, esp for patients over 65- up to 4% of the population! Compression bandaging is the most recognized therapy but due to lack of education of the healthcare professionals regarding application and other treatment modalities, lack of patient funds, poor insurance reimbursement for stockings and bandaging- patients suffer for at least a year or up to 10 years needlessly.

Ross K Smith and Jonathan Golledge wrote a paper ( Phlebology 2014 Vol 29 (9) 570-579)  on a review of circulatory markers in CVI and their abstract and paper to follow shows providers could evaluate patients levels of estradiol, homocysteine and vascular growth factors that were most consistently associated with primary chronic venous insufficiency.

Circulatory markers studies can improve pathogenic understanding, increase prognostic understanding and enhance diagnostic and treatment modalities.

Early recognition of vein disease with comprehensive diagnostic evaluation and in-office minimally invasive vein treatments: revolutionary glue ablations, radiofrequency or laser ablations and ultrasound guided chemical ablations of ” faulty valve- diseased” saphenous veins, accessory veins, pudendal veins, and even pelvic vein disorders can prevent the road to leg ulcers, DVTs, and varicose vein disease disorders.

Schedule a vein screening and learn about vein disease from Morrison Vein Institute.

We have been dedicated to vein disease for 20 years.

Vein Disease equals varicose and spider veins

Hereditary risk factors for vein disease such as family history of veins combined with age, sedentary lifestyle, prolonged sitting or standing, and increased BMI, cigarette smoking, and pregnancies, all add to our chances of varicose and spider veins. The venous circulation is supposed to go up the legs back to the heart as the diagram above depicts. But with reflux, venous disease called venous insufficiency, the blood goes down the wrong way causing blood pooling and a cascade of events over time.

50% of women by the time they are 50 years old can have vein disease and 25% of men and this goes up 10% a decade. So with early intervention of easy in office vein venous ultrasound scan for a diagnosis and vein map, vein treatments there is a way ti minimize our disease process. Combine this with exercise, leg elevation, calf muscle pump exercises and good medical compression socks or stockings, we can minimize detrimental effects of varicose veins and their symptoms and complications: skin changes, restless legs, leg swelling, cramping, heaviness, feet ” burning” sensation, vulvar varicosities, deep vein thrombosis, thrombophlebitis, itching, and of course surface veins.

Come talk to us, see an informational video, get measured for compression socks and plan for  healthier legs. 480-775-8460  Tempe, Scottsdale  info@morrisonvein.com for questions. We look forward to seeing you.

 

azcentral.com: Do your legs itch or swell?

There may be more to your varicose veins than meets the eye.

Blood clots, ulcers and other concerns could loom

Often women with varicose veins – and some men too – visit a vein specialist with thoughts of looking better in shorts or a swimsuit. But many come away surprised to learn this seemingly cosmetic problem could be tied to serious health risks.

Dr. Nick Morrison is the founder of the Morrison Vein Institute in Scottsdale and Tempe, Ariz. He is a world-renowned phlebologist and the past president of the American College of Phlebology. Morrison has seen many patient consultations where the conversation shifts from aesthetics to potentially life-saving lifestyle changes and treatment options.

“I’ll ask if the legs are feeling itchy. Are they swelling? Do your legs feel heavy when you stand on them for a long time? Do you have a family history of varicose veins or stroke? These are very important questions that could say a lot about what’s happening under that surface vein problem,” Morrison adds.

Varicose veins occur when a vein’s valves stop functioning properly. With these faulty valves, instead of blood flowing in one direction toward the heart, as it should, it now moves in both directions and pools in areas of the vein. These pools of blood can then be seen on the skin’s surface.

And there can be so much more to the story, Morrison says.

Chronic disease

Varicose veins are also associated with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI), which can bring leg swelling as a result of increased blood pressure in poorly functioning veins. The condition most commonly occurs as a result of a blood clot in a deep, larger vein, which is known as Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT).

DVT is particularly dangerous, as a Pulmonary Embolism (PE) could occur if the clot breaks free and travels to the lungs. PE is responsible for between 60,000 and 100,000 deaths each year.

More superficial blood clots are referred to as phlebitis, or thrombophlebitis, and can produce pain and swelling. But phlebitis is far less serious than DVT since it occurs in smaller veins closer to the skin’s surface.

“Often times a patient may see a new varicose vein and it’s a call to action for them. With a checkup they can now explore what’s going on under the surface,” Morrison adds.

For checkups, Morrison conducts a venous reflux study, which involves an ultrasound of the leg. The non-invasive approach is welcomed over the sometimes uncomfortable venogram method, which uses an x-ray and dyes to view veins. The ultrasound and detailed family history allow Morrison’s team to create a treatment map. Patients can be in and out in less than an hour and leave with a wealth of information about the current state of their venous system.

“Many types of insurances cover testing because they want to rule out DVT or blood clots,” Morrison adds. “You can’t just treat the surface veins. The patient needs to understand the whole picture.”Az Republic Gallery

 Read More…

az_central

Terri Morrison Teaches Course on Sclerotherapy & Compression for ACP

Terri Morrison, co-founder of Morrison Vein Institute, was asked by The American College of Phlebology to teach a nursing course in California this month. Nurses from all around the nation came to learn about treating veins with sclerotherapy and compression. Terri was teaching the course with several other experts in the field of Phlebology, which is the study of veins and vein disease. The course was a huge success and Terri was thankful she was asked to be a part of it.

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World Vein Specialists gather in Arizona

Dr. Morrison has organized a “meeting of the minds” for the last several years in Arizona for the worlds-best vein specialists. They are all here this weekend discussing treatments for varicose veins, the practice of Phlebology, compression therapy for veins, wound care, and all the ways to improve the diagnosis and treatment of vein disease. Experts traveled from around the US, Europe and South America to be a part of this very special invitation-only medical conference, which focuses not on a series of lectures, but of scientific topics presented and discussed. This structure allows for in-depth discussion of phlebology. This year’s meeting was sponsored by an unconditional education grant from MediUSA. Some of the presenters, world-renowned physicians, and invited guests include, Lars Rasmussen, Giovanni Mosti, Felizitas Pannier, Tom Wakefield, Allesandro Pieri, Jonathon Wanderer, Diana Neuhardt, Hugo Partsch, Dean Bender, Eric Mowatt-Larssen, Nick Morrison, Steven Zimmet, Joseph Caprini, Joe Zygmunt, Stephen Daugherty, Mark Forrestal, Dermott Moore, Mark Meissner, Helane Fronek, and many other brilliant minds. They got to have a little fun too, as shown in the pictures below.

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Got Swollen Legs or Ankles? Or Both?

Leg swelling can be caused by several different things. One reason your legs could be swollen, tired and heavy is from bad veins in your legs. When valves in the veins in your legs don’t close properly, pressure builds up in them. This can force fluid to leak out of the veins into the surrounding tissue. This valve malfunction is known as venous insufficiency, or vein disease. Vein doctors, aka Phlebologists can treat this with minimally-invasive in-office procedures. If left untreated, it can lead to blood clots, leg ulcers, varicose veins, restless legs, skin irritations, thrombophlebitis, cramping, itching, heaviness, etc…Image
Another cause of swelling is called lymphedema. The lymphatic system is somewhat similar to your venous system in that there is flow of lymph fluid back to the center of your body. If that system is impaired, fluid and proteins can leak into the surrounding tissue, causing swelling and discomfort similar to venous swelling. Lymphedema can be primary, meaning the cause is unknown. It can also be secondary, which is caused by anything that changes the lymphatic return. Common causes include trauma from surgery performed close to lymph nodes or vessels, removal of lymph nodes due to cancer surgery, radiation, infections or other traumas.
Lymphedema should not be mistaken for venous swelling. However, untreated venous insufficiency can progress into a combined venous and lymph disorder and massive swelling can occur, limiting walking, daily activities and cause permanent skin changes. The National Lymphedema Network is a great resource for information about lymphedema. Their website is http://www.lymphnet.orgImage.

So, the short of it is, if you have swollen feet, ankles and/or legs, seek help from a Phlebologist who specializes in veins. They can diagnose vein disease and lymphedema, then treat the veins in your legs if that is the root cause. If lymphedema treatment is needed, they can send you to a lymphedema specialist.

World Phlebology Meeting in Boston was a Huge Success

All of our staff at Morrison Vein Institute had the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to attend the International vein meeting in Boston last week. Dr Morrison was the chair for the whole meeting and choreographed a 1600 person meeting of world experts in veins and vein disease with the help of the American College of Phlebology. Terri Morrison and most of our RN staff were invited to present at the meeting, so we all went in support of our team.

Terri Morrison participated in workshops and gave presentations on compression therapy for venous problems with other world-renowned compression experts. Barbara Deusterman, BSN, RN was the Nursing Section chair for the meeting, so she and Kathy Melfy faciliated the Nursing Symposiums throughout the week. Barbara also presented several case studies and gave talks on sclerotherapy do’s and don’ts. Kathy Melfy, BSN, RN presented on “Empowering your patients,” and “Treating the Underlying Aspects of Inflammation in Venous Disease.” Kathy and Terri also participated on a panel about “Comminication with Patients.”  Jackie McGrath presented a case study on “The Importance of Endovenous Thermal Ablation.” Susie Baker, BSN, RN presented a case study on KTS and gave a talk on “Verbal Anesthesia during procedures.”  Janice Beans, RN presented case studies on KTS and unusual venous problems.

As you can see from the pictures below, we learned, we presented, we networked and we celebrated…Dr Morrison was elected President of the International Union of Phlebology during our week in Boston!!! YAY!!

photo 1 (6)Dr Morrison being congratulatedphoto 1 (8)photo 3 (4)photo 3 (6)

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Why Treat Your Veins Now?!?!

Sclerotherapy in the Summer? No way, right? It’s 110 in Arizona, support hose are hot and I would be uncomfortable. Wait!!! I’m already uncomfortable. I was diagnosed with venous reflux, aka vein disease, 5 years ago. I have had several procedures done and need annual maintenance with USGS injections. I also wanted surface vein injections but could never “find the time”. So, it’s June and you ask why am I uncomfortable? My legs feel worse in the summer due to the heat which dilates the veins. They feel heavy, achy and I now have severe cramping that wakes me up several times a night. So should I just suffer until summers over? Oh wait, it’s hot until October. I decided to have the injections and I couldn’t be happier. I love hiking and the great outdoors, but I don’t do any of that in the summer anyway. I am indoors, in air conditioning and can still swim whenever I want (without the stockings on). My symptoms have gone away, my legs already feel better and I will be out of the hose in 9 more days. This was so much easier than I thought.

susie in tie dye compression leggingsThe support hose feel great on my legs and I feel energized without the aching and cramping. Was it easy? No, I would prefer to not wear stockings at the gym when working out, and it’s a bit warm getting in and out of the car……..but I’d do it again in a heartbeat. Feeling better right away and taking care of myself is much easier than suffering through a long hot summer and fall waiting to “find the right time”. So what are you waiting for?

Written by Susie Baker, RN
Posted by Kelly